Faust By

Faust By Navigationsmenü

"Faust. Der Tragödie erster Teil" (kurz Faust I) von Johann Wolfgang von Goethe gilt als das bedeutendste und meistzitierte Werk der deutschen Literatur. Die veröffentlichte Tragödie greift die Geschichte des historischen Doktor Faustus auf. from "Faust" by Johann Wolfgang Goethe It is very important to realize the great importance of water in the cosmic events, so that life and fertility can be. Faust by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Drama, European | Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von, Brooks, Charles Timothy | ISBN: | Kostenloser. Faust calls itself "A Tragedy" right enough, but it might just as well be described as a musical comedy -- it's ripe with comic passages, features many songs, and. Damals auf "Polydor" als Clear Vinyl im durchsichtigen Cover erschienen wurde dies zu einem der schwerer zugänglichen Klassiker des sogannten.

Faust By

from "Faust" by Johann Wolfgang Goethe It is very important to realize the great importance of water in the cosmic events, so that life and fertility can be. Faust calls itself "A Tragedy" right enough, but it might just as well be described as a musical comedy -- it's ripe with comic passages, features many songs, and. Faust. Eine Tragödie. (auch Faust. Der Tragödie erster Teil oder kurz Faust I) von Johann Wolfgang von Goethe gilt als das bedeutendste und meistzitierte Werk. Faust in Gedanken auf und ab gehend. Mir ist für meine Wette gar nicht Faust By. Wir gehen eben fort. So setzest du der ewig regen, [89] Der heilsam schaffenden Gewalt Spielanleitung Super Roulette kalte Teufelsfaust entgegen, Die sich vergebens tückisch ballt! Das thut mir herzlich leid! Du alt Geräthe das ich nicht gebraucht, Du stehst nur hier, weil dich mein Vater brauchte. Mit der Drohung, andernfalls den Pakt zu brechen, fordert Faust von Mephisto, Gretchen noch am gleichen Tag zu seiner Geliebten zu machen. Mephistos Bemerkung nach seiner Begegnung mit dem Schüler: Dir wird gewiss einmal bei deiner Gottähnlichkeit bange! Skill7 Com Spiele ist von Gretchens Aussehen und Wesen eingenommen: Nettode etwas hab ich Roulette Game Free Play gesehn. Ey sage mir, du Sohn der Hölle, [90] Wenn das dich bannt, wie kamst du denn herein? Graphic Novel paperback: Faust: Der Tragödie erster Teil [Flix, Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von] on xc-cupen.se *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Graphic. Faust. Eine Tragödie. (auch Faust. Der Tragödie erster Teil oder kurz Faust I) von Johann Wolfgang von Goethe gilt als das bedeutendste und meistzitierte Werk. Download Citation | Lesarten von Goethes Faust by Ulrich Gaier, and: Johann Wolfgang Goethe, Faust: Eine Tragödie, Erster Theil, Frühere Fassung ("Urfaust")​. Faust. Eine Tragödie. von. Goethe. Tübingen. in der J. G. Cotta'schen Buchhandlung. [3]. Ich bin nicht gern genirt. Wer darf das Kind beym rechten Namen nennen? Und was das liebe junge Volk betrifft, Das ist Jessica Penne nie so naseweis gewesen. Die Gräber beben! Bis dahin! Siehst du die Schnecke da! Ihr Herren geht nicht so vorbey! Er stand auf der Schwelle. Ich führe dich und was ich thun kann, höre! Faust hat von diesem derben Treiben bald genug, aber Mephisto bittet um Geduld: Gib nur erst acht, die Bestialität wird sich Faust By herrlich offenbaren. Sie schlief damit wir uns freuten. Und thut sich nicht der Nap Star auf Sie alle zu verschlingen, So will ich mit behendem Lauf Gleich in Malen Nach Zahlen Online Ausmalen Hölle springen. Faust By The play introduces Faust while he sits in his study in despair over his life. Is Russian Roulette Real More in these related Britannica articles:. Although rarely staged in its entirety, it is the play with the largest audience numbers on German-language stages. How is that Kombiwetten Tricks for knowledge? Faust is unconvinced, however, by their crude cares and simple lives. Charles Gounod. However, even in translation Goethe's Faust has great poetic power.

Faust By - Inhaltsverzeichnis

Aufgescheucht fliegen die Eulen. Wo bist du? Hier ist ein Lied! Genug die Maus war doch nicht grau. Die früh sich einst dem trüben Blick gezeigt. Faust By

Faust By Video

Faust - Der Tragödie Erster Teil - Goethe Das ist die Zauberey, du leicht verführter Thor! Der Unmensch ohne Zweck und Ruh? Greift nur hinein ins volle Menschenleben! Dennoch sei sie Texas Holdem Poker Gratis Spielen. Er wird ihn nicht sobald zum zweytenmale Spors Bet. Ich bin der Geist der stets verneint!

Work on Faust accompanied Goethe throughout his adult life. Of a possible plan in to dramatize the story of Learn More in these related Britannica articles:.

Of a possible plan in to dramatize the story of the man who sold his soul to the Devil in exchange for earthly fulfillment, perhaps including his ultimate redemption, no firm evidence survives.

German literature: Weimar Classicism: Goethe and Schiller. Reed puts it in his biography Goethe of Goethe and Schiller and is considered the culmination of German literature.

Modern critics have described long poems such as T. History at your fingertips. Sign up here to see what happened On This Day , every day in your inbox!

Email address. By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Notice. Be on the lookout for your Britannica newsletter to get trusted stories delivered right to your inbox.

More About. So Faust is a very learned man who has studied everything that ever existed, and yet he still feels he's missing something about existence, something that isn't written down in those books and that perhaps cannot be put to words.

He then expresses the words that have become famous because of their depth and their importance in this work: 'Two souls, alas, dwell in my breast, each seeks to rule without the other.

And it's the Spirit who lowers this learned man to his human condition, making him aware of his delimited understanding.

Faust, however, persists and trying to prove his godliness, he tries to commit suicide, when suddenly the the church bells ring and an angelic choir from above is heard, announcing Christ's resurrection.

The agreement is settled with blood. Then he meets Gretchen, also known as Margaret, and that's what Faust's misery gets worse — and even worse for Gretchen, who before meeting Faust and his horrid companion was such a pure creature that at first Mephisto does not think he can get her.

Faust blames Mephistopheles for distracting him at the Walpurus Night instead of taking him to save Gretchen. This is when I realised Goethe used Mephisto to point out the flaws of our minds, sometimes in earnest, sometimes in jest, like people's tendency to blame external, sometimes supernatural causes for their mistakes.

I'm afraid Goethe wrote the second part until the last year of his life. I'm not as learned as Doctor Faust, but I think I found in reading this book the kind of fervor he was looking for.

Illustrated by Goethe himself. View all 11 comments. There's something discomforting about the vague moral convictions of Goethe's Faust character.

One would assume, that even a scholar living in Goethe's time would find the typical preoccupations of Christian morality somewhat boring, if not basically delusional and overzealous.

After all, the cacophony of self-doubt racing through his mind is not initially brought on by anything that resembles religious guilt.

He's a man plagued by the hermetic stuffiness of a lifestyle of perpetual deep thought There's something discomforting about the vague moral convictions of Goethe's Faust character.

He's a man plagued by the hermetic stuffiness of a lifestyle of perpetual deep thought. All of his forced questions about the complexity of the universe have not been adequately revealed to him in the immense amount of reading and study that he has undertaken throughout the course of his life.

Something is missing. In the opening soliloquy he desperately gropes out loud in an attempt to locate the source of his emptiness.

He intones Oh, but nothing more. Where can I grasp you, never-ending Nature? Breasts, where? You founts of all of life, That earth and heaven hang upon love And where the parched soul craves to be, You flow, you give to drink, but not to me.

In the beginning it's difficult to tell whether Faust harbors any faith in God. Faust desires some sort of ineffable experience; he desires a base inflammation of the senses, most importantly of his own passion for life.

It could be argued that Mephistopheles appears essentially because Faust desires to lose himself in sublime sinfulness. God might only show up to suggest that his mortal frustrations and complex questions can in fact be answered, but only by one book.

More importantly, if it were for the grace of God's true presence in Faust's existence, his questions would abate under the reverent awe of his own faith.

It's obviously not there. It's at this point that Mephistopheles appears, offering what any average mortal would desire in the throes of their own suffering, brought on by an overwhelming abundance of probing, difficult questions; namely the earthly pleasures of amorous love.

To be clear, Gretchen's character is offered to Faust to appease the longings of his heart more than that of his loins. Having the position and immortal power that Mephistopheles does, he understands that Faust will be more than willing to accept his wager.

But, as most critics suggest, Mephistopheles also knows that a character such as Faust, despite not really being a man of faith, will ruin such an immediate route to happiness.

Naturally, Gretchen detects the way in which this internal struggle of Faust's causes him to be so distant.

Not only that, but she distrusts Mephistopheles, and is committed to God. There is a clunky and somewhat fragmented quality to the way that Goethe presents many of the difficult concerns of Faust and his wager with Mephistopheles.

Initially, he is so troubled, merely by the thought that all of his worldly academic efforts are made in vain. His frustration with the futility of his effort to enlighten himself and to better understand the beautiful complexity of the world, reaches a sort of peak, at which point he loses faith in virtually everything.

At first amused by the idea of the very appearance of Mephistopheles, he's eventually perplexed by how effortlessly he can access the very happiness which he could hardly even give a name to.

Is he, in this sense, troubled once again by the knowledge that he possesses, the knowledge of the disappointing outcome of his temporary pleasures?

One could almost draw a parallel to Nietzsche's description of the existential frustration that cripples Shakespeare's Hamlet from acting on his anger due to the knowledge that he has of the awful situation occurring around him.

To an atheist, especially an academic one, virtually all of this might sound a little silly. The reality of the situation is that Mephistopheles is actually quite fun.

As he says in response to Faust's question of who Mephistopheles is, "A part of the power who wills evil always but always works the good.

This might sound confusing to some, but what he's doing is mockingly suggesting to Faust that his attachment to traditional notions of sin and goodliness is ridiculous.

Toward the end, Faust ignorantly insists that the wager is destined to end in despair and disappointment. Mephistopheles, already aware of how seemingly full of disappointment most mortal situations might appeal to human beings, basically has a little fun with Faust's misguided convictions of goodness.

So then is this a tragedy? Toward the end of the first part of Goethe's morally confusing masterpiece, it becomes increasingly difficult to believe that there is anything tragic about the fate of Faust.

Sep 11, Michael Finocchiaro rated it it was amazing Shelves: fiction , classics , germanth-c , favorites.

Goethe's Faust, particularly the first part is one of the monuments of western literature. The characters of Mephisto, Faust and Margarite and unforgettable.

It has, of course inspired operas from Berlioz to Busoni and books writers such as Thomas Mann. It was actually adapted from an earlier version by Christopher Marlowe but Goethe's version is even more sinister and lifelike.

May 18, Duffy Pratt rated it it was ok. Who knew that this book, one of the most famous in literature, was actually two separate works that seem only slightly related?

I certainly didn't. The first part is a fairly ordinary play that gets dunked in profundity through the inclusion of Mephistopheles. There are only a few main characters here, and there wasn't much depth to any of them.

I've heard that the German is tremendously good, but it's impossible for me to judge. I switched back and forth in this part between two different trans Who knew that this book, one of the most famous in literature, was actually two separate works that seem only slightly related?

I switched back and forth in this part between two different translations. I liked the free kindle version better than my Oxford edition, but I wasn't really taken in with the language of either, except in some small parts.

On its own, I have to say that I enjoyed the first part. The second part is unlike anything I've ever read. If I didn't know that it had been invented in my lifetime, I'd swear that Goethe got himself into some very, very fine LSD.

It's very weird, jumps all over the place, and gives the impression that anything, no matter how fantastical, could be made to occur. It feels like it could never be produced as a play.

There are way too many speakers -- I hesitate to call any of them characters. In this second part, a mood might start talking, or a mythological creature, or an inanimate object, or anything at all for that matter.

And I have no idea how, if staged, anyone would know which "character" was speaking at any time. Unless, like in a childrens play, Thales or Speed-Booty, wore a placard saying who he was.

The stage directions can be just as dumbfounding. At one point, one direction says: "To the younger members of the audience who did not applaud.

What if the entire audience applauded? It is one of the stranger directions I've ever seen in a play, and it made me think that Goethe may have been over a hundred years ahead of his time.

Or maybe he just realized that this was a "play" that would only ever be read, and he was just having some fun with the directions.

Ultimately, this work is a long piece of lyric poetry, and I'm willing to accept that in German it is remarkably great poetry. I suppose that people who don't speak English might have just as hard a time figuring out what's so great about Shakespeare, and that makes me sad.

But, reading Proust made me decide to learn French. I never felt anything like that tug towards German while reading Faust. View all 4 comments.

Oct 12, Sophia rated it it was amazing. Ironically, Faust reveals his disapproval for books as a true source of knowledge in understanding the world; we must turn to life and living, and experience instead.

I call this ironic because while he denounces books, Faust is a book. Mar 19, Christopher rated it it was amazing Shelves: drama , fiction , 19th-century , classics , german.

Not since watching Breaking Bad have I been so enthralled by a man's descent into depravity. What a tragedy! How beautifully, subtly crafted. This was one of the most heart wrenching books I've read in a long time.

Jan 30, Ivana Books Are Magic rated it liked it. I did like the first part more than the second one, but I must admit that I prefer the Marlowe's version.

I suppose that is a very plain way of putting it, but there it is. I do see why Goethe's Faust is a classic.

It is a highly praised book and deserving so. It is in many ways a timeless work, but it is not one of my favourite ones. Personally, I couldn't connect with this work of art on a deeper level.

Faust is known for the power of its language. Some of it might be lost in translation, I ca I did like the first part more than the second one, but I must admit that I prefer the Marlowe's version.

Some of it might be lost in translation, I cannot be the judge of that. I read this book in translation, I had to. I don't read in German and I doubt I will ever learn the language.

The full brilliance of original verse will probably remain lost to me. However, even in translation Goethe's Faust has great poetic power. That's definitely my favourite thing about Faust.

The first part of Faust has some amazingly beautiful verses! Potent and beautiful verses are always something to be admired.

I wish that I could say that I was as impressed by the content as I was with the form, but I cannot. The story is too abstract, it is quite high paced at times and yet not in a way I like, sometimes it is confusing.

It seemed to me that Faust does not have the dept I was looking for in it. Perhaps I just didn't know how to find it.

Still, it wasn't as meaningful and layered as I would except for this type of writing. Moreover, the character of Faust was not clear to me, I felt nothing for him, I had no sense of his character development.

I didn't like the ending much, either. There were some really meaningful lines here and there, yet I did not have that sense of a great and tragic soul- there was something almost mediocre about this Faust.

In addition, the dialogues between him and Mephistopheles were not as witty as I expected. I do not mind the fact that this is a hybrid between a play and an extended poem.

Neither do I have anything against the literary period it was written in. It's simply that I think it could be better. At one point of reading Faust I was even bored, so I tried imagining it on the stage- in my mind it worked.

I wonder what it would really look like on stage. I know it is a popular play, despite the fact that it was written as a closet drama.

Although it is quite long, I do not really see it as a closet drama. In my opinion the best part of the Faust is the poetry, the form, the language- in that aspect the play is a complete success.

The content didn't impress me as such. At times Faust was great, at times boring, I don't know how to put it any other way. I expected more.

David Constantine's translation modernizes this amazing piece of High German lit, but George Madison Priest's translation seems, at least to me, to have a more seductive flow and more tempting poetry.

Mar 03, Olivia-Savannah Roach rated it liked it. This was assigned reading for university. I was quite confused and disconnected from the play as I read it.

Although I did understand and could follow what was happening, I was lost as to the relevance of the play.

I did not enjoy reading it. But then I continued on to analysing the play and studying it - and there was where I discovered its worth, the themes it discusses and could appreciate the wit and aim of the play more.

But it still couldn't be counted as an enjoyable or very enlightening This was assigned reading for university. But it still couldn't be counted as an enjoyable or very enlightening read for me personally.

Philosophy, blasphemy, sorcery, seduction, murder and orgy—oh my! But if such things were in the works to ensure that when I did read this book I would be mos Philosophy, blasphemy, sorcery, seduction, murder and orgy—oh my!

But if such things were in the works to ensure that when I did read this book I would be most capable of appreciating its saturate brilliance, I gladly do not regret them.

The young man who might have then read Faust would have lacked the perspective of the living, the loving, the suffering, reading, writing and especially meditating the intervening years were.

The world of the spirit is not sealed; Your mind is shut, your soul is dead! Awake my son, and all unwearied Bathe in the dawn of your mortal breast!

What a fucking treat! Randall Jerrell translation Tricksters make this world Lord to Mephisto: "And never come but finding fault always?

Never a thing on earth gives you content? He cannot understand the disparity between humans. The discontentment isn't really a discontentment but inability to accept the things the way they are.

Isn't that ambition all about? He doesn't say that out loud but its given to him as an answer by the Tricksters make this world He doesn't say that out loud but its given to him as an answer by the lord.

The very foundation of Faust is based on the fact that an overtly ambitious man signs up his fate with dubious evil forces. For one to dream of the extraordinary and then to achieve, a compromise is made that leads them to inevitable downfall.

They get corrupted, tainted, manipulated and eventually partially destroyed by the undoing of their own imagination. Faust and Mephisto make up this striking pair whose conversations reveal more of humanity and its idiosyncrasies.

They are the two sides of the conversation, a pair of oddities stuck on the side for a long ride. It goes on. The devil nudges when the human nature fails to take the leap.

Faust: A man who wonders why he cannot be God with all the possibilities of making one, surrounding him. In a society we need Faust and Quixote and Hamlet and Don Juan - the "overweeners" with their capacity to shift the thought process of the society to what it can achieve.

Kinda grateful I didn't read this in school. I would have hated it and probably not understood the writing as well as now. I actually really enjoyed the writing a lot more than I had thought I would.

On the other hand I kinda miss reading this slow as you do in school and discuss different sections on the way. I tend to not go beyond my own ideas and understanding when I read a book on my own.

I also need to say a few words on the audiobook I listened to, Jürgen Fritsche does an amazing job at nar Kinda grateful I didn't read this in school.

I also need to say a few words on the audiobook I listened to, Jürgen Fritsche does an amazing job at narrating it and I am attributing his interpretation of the text a bit to my enjoyment of it.

If you struggled reading it I recommend listening to the audio and see if that makes it more accessible for you.

Jan 08, Michelle rated it it was ok Shelves: big-lipped-alligator , not-so-classic-books. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. This book--play? We start in heaven, with Mephistopheles making some sort of vague deal with God to try and get a Doctor Faust damned.

They say that this Faust is some sort of a Job, even though we then cut to him despairing enough to contemplate suicide--and he hasn't even met Mephistopheles yet!

The demon then turns into a poodle--seriously-follows him in from a brief walk, and ends up making a deal with him. I'm not really sure about the deal because they throw in all so This book--play?

I'm not really sure about the deal because they throw in all sorts of confusing asides about "you can take me to Hell in the hour I wish for that hour to last longer" or something.

It ends up being just when his natural lifespan ends, he goes straight to hell. Mephistopheles finds him a girl to seduce whose name is either Gretchen or Margareta--apparently Gretchen is a shortening of the name, but nobody told me that, and I never would have guessed--and then he leaves to go cavort with witches and fairies.

When he comes back, she's in jail for having killed her mother and his baby. She wants to die, and Mephistopheles hauls Faust off as the jailers come.

Wouldn't Faust's death now mean he goes straight to hell? End Part One. Part Two opens with a pastoral scene of fairies doing vague things.

This is the literary version of Bambi's mother's death. We bounce around with various kings fighting, and then the story turns into an Iliad fanfic, pairing up Helen of Troy with Faust.

She dies. Faust gets old and dies, then the angels come and swipe him out of Mephistopheles's grasp. No, they don't really explain this.

It might be because he "strove," but if that's it, then what we have is a mess of works righteousness--and what's more, these good actions that saved him were not shown!

This book is crazy. I read that it took Goethe sixty years on-and-off to write, and it looks as if he didn't bother to go over what he'd written before.

The plot halts for long stretches, characters we've never met before spout a few lines as their introduction and leave, and Faust himself is often left in the dust.

There's one particularly long section in which we follow a homunculus and philosopher around, without even Mephistopheles to pretend this has anything to do with the rest of the story.

Random bits of mythology are injected whenever possible, whether it makes any sense or not. Maybe other versions of Faust are better, I don't know.

If it had stopped at Part One, it would have worked, but it didn't. I only read this because Faust was in The Band Wagon. The Band Wagon is awesome.

Go watch that instead. I get that this an important novel. It's full of metaphors and meaning and humor of a sort and blahblahblah.

Just no. I liked the idea , the Faustian myth. How is that searching for knowledge? How does that help Faust crack the mysteries of the metaphysical?

How does knocking up a fifteen year old girl and killing her brother AND helping her accidentally kill her mother, wtf, seriously, what EVEN help him reach transcendental knowledge??

I'm pretty sure I was like for most of the book With the occasional Followed by And for good measure When I finally finished I was all hide spoiler ] View all 14 comments.

Oct 08, linda flourishreader rated it it was ok Shelves: own-a-copy , reads , classics. What is Faust? To me, there is no answer to that question.

Faust evades description and assignment. It is many things at once: pure poetry, closet play, classical tragedy, and even comedy. It is irreverent to its own material, changing in focus and mood at whim.

Goethe shamelessly cuts into the most dramatic moments of the Gretchen tragedy to include completely spurious epigrams. At a glance, the wager between Faust and Mephistopheles seems almost tacked on to the parts dealing with his relati What is Faust?

At a glance, the wager between Faust and Mephistopheles seems almost tacked on to the parts dealing with his relationship with Gretchen and vice versa.

That being said, there is a continuity to it all. Although rough, it flows and some semblance can be gleaned of the entire work.

It is both complete and fragmentary. Above everything else, the amazingly poetic sections and the very gripping tragedy of Gretchen, it is this fragmentary nature that I find most enjoyable.

No statue of Michelangelo, not even the Pieta, has ever touched me in the same way as his incomplete Slaves.

David, perfect in its Vitruvian proportions, is so distant and inhuman it touches me as an allegory given an alien human shape. The incomplete Slave, still half buried in the rough marble, speaks to me of perfect humanity.

The process is still underway. The thoughts of the artist are still visible.

In earlier eras the play was often decried as formless because of its array of lyric, epic, dramatic, operatic, and balletic elements.

To modern critics, however, this mixture of forms and styles suggested a deliberate attempt to create a vehicle of cultural comment rather than an inability to create a coherent form of his own, and the content with which Goethe invested his forms bears out the modern interpretation.

He drew on an immense variety of cultural material—theological, mythological, philosophical, political, economic, scientific, aesthetic , musical, literary—for the more realistic Part I no less than for the more symbolic Part II.

Article Media. Info Print Cite. Submit Feedback. Thank you for your feedback. Home Literature Plays. In despair Faust follows it with his eyes; he falls to his knees and prays.

Although the Walpurgisnacht ballet sequence from act 5 is often omitted from staged opera performances, it is frequently performed separately as part of a ballet program, e.

George Balanchine 's Walpurgisnacht Ballet. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Grand opera in five acts by Charles Gounod.

This article is about the opera by Charles Gounod. For the opera by Louis Spohr, see Faust Spohr. A moi les plaisirs". CD review: Faust , Gounod. Opera , February , Vol.

The New York Times. Retrieved 16 September Charles Gounod. Sapho , rev. Cecilia Mass Pontifical Anthem Gallia Walpurgisnacht Ballet Tavistock House.

List of compositions by Charles Gounod. Works based on Faust. Historia von D. Johann Fausten Faustus, the Last Night Faust ballet Faust ballets.

Namespaces Article Talk. I don't read in German and I doubt I will ever learn the language. The full brilliance of original verse will probably remain lost to me.

However, even in translation Goethe's Faust has great poetic power. That's definitely my favourite thing about Faust.

The first part of Faust has some amazingly beautiful verses! Potent and beautiful verses are always something to be admired.

I wish that I could say that I was as impressed by the content as I was with the form, but I cannot. The story is too abstract, it is quite high paced at times and yet not in a way I like, sometimes it is confusing.

It seemed to me that Faust does not have the dept I was looking for in it. Perhaps I just didn't know how to find it. Still, it wasn't as meaningful and layered as I would except for this type of writing.

Moreover, the character of Faust was not clear to me, I felt nothing for him, I had no sense of his character development. I didn't like the ending much, either.

There were some really meaningful lines here and there, yet I did not have that sense of a great and tragic soul- there was something almost mediocre about this Faust.

In addition, the dialogues between him and Mephistopheles were not as witty as I expected. I do not mind the fact that this is a hybrid between a play and an extended poem.

Neither do I have anything against the literary period it was written in. It's simply that I think it could be better.

At one point of reading Faust I was even bored, so I tried imagining it on the stage- in my mind it worked. I wonder what it would really look like on stage.

I know it is a popular play, despite the fact that it was written as a closet drama. Although it is quite long, I do not really see it as a closet drama.

In my opinion the best part of the Faust is the poetry, the form, the language- in that aspect the play is a complete success. The content didn't impress me as such.

At times Faust was great, at times boring, I don't know how to put it any other way. I expected more. David Constantine's translation modernizes this amazing piece of High German lit, but George Madison Priest's translation seems, at least to me, to have a more seductive flow and more tempting poetry.

Mar 03, Olivia-Savannah Roach rated it liked it. This was assigned reading for university. I was quite confused and disconnected from the play as I read it.

Although I did understand and could follow what was happening, I was lost as to the relevance of the play. I did not enjoy reading it.

But then I continued on to analysing the play and studying it - and there was where I discovered its worth, the themes it discusses and could appreciate the wit and aim of the play more.

But it still couldn't be counted as an enjoyable or very enlightening This was assigned reading for university.

But it still couldn't be counted as an enjoyable or very enlightening read for me personally. Philosophy, blasphemy, sorcery, seduction, murder and orgy—oh my!

But if such things were in the works to ensure that when I did read this book I would be mos Philosophy, blasphemy, sorcery, seduction, murder and orgy—oh my!

But if such things were in the works to ensure that when I did read this book I would be most capable of appreciating its saturate brilliance, I gladly do not regret them.

The young man who might have then read Faust would have lacked the perspective of the living, the loving, the suffering, reading, writing and especially meditating the intervening years were.

The world of the spirit is not sealed; Your mind is shut, your soul is dead! Awake my son, and all unwearied Bathe in the dawn of your mortal breast!

What a fucking treat! Randall Jerrell translation Tricksters make this world Lord to Mephisto: "And never come but finding fault always?

Never a thing on earth gives you content? He cannot understand the disparity between humans. The discontentment isn't really a discontentment but inability to accept the things the way they are.

Isn't that ambition all about? He doesn't say that out loud but its given to him as an answer by the Tricksters make this world He doesn't say that out loud but its given to him as an answer by the lord.

The very foundation of Faust is based on the fact that an overtly ambitious man signs up his fate with dubious evil forces.

For one to dream of the extraordinary and then to achieve, a compromise is made that leads them to inevitable downfall.

They get corrupted, tainted, manipulated and eventually partially destroyed by the undoing of their own imagination. Faust and Mephisto make up this striking pair whose conversations reveal more of humanity and its idiosyncrasies.

They are the two sides of the conversation, a pair of oddities stuck on the side for a long ride. It goes on. The devil nudges when the human nature fails to take the leap.

Faust: A man who wonders why he cannot be God with all the possibilities of making one, surrounding him.

In a society we need Faust and Quixote and Hamlet and Don Juan - the "overweeners" with their capacity to shift the thought process of the society to what it can achieve.

Kinda grateful I didn't read this in school. I would have hated it and probably not understood the writing as well as now. I actually really enjoyed the writing a lot more than I had thought I would.

On the other hand I kinda miss reading this slow as you do in school and discuss different sections on the way.

I tend to not go beyond my own ideas and understanding when I read a book on my own. I also need to say a few words on the audiobook I listened to, Jürgen Fritsche does an amazing job at nar Kinda grateful I didn't read this in school.

I also need to say a few words on the audiobook I listened to, Jürgen Fritsche does an amazing job at narrating it and I am attributing his interpretation of the text a bit to my enjoyment of it.

If you struggled reading it I recommend listening to the audio and see if that makes it more accessible for you.

Jan 08, Michelle rated it it was ok Shelves: big-lipped-alligator , not-so-classic-books. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. This book--play? We start in heaven, with Mephistopheles making some sort of vague deal with God to try and get a Doctor Faust damned.

They say that this Faust is some sort of a Job, even though we then cut to him despairing enough to contemplate suicide--and he hasn't even met Mephistopheles yet!

The demon then turns into a poodle--seriously-follows him in from a brief walk, and ends up making a deal with him. I'm not really sure about the deal because they throw in all so This book--play?

I'm not really sure about the deal because they throw in all sorts of confusing asides about "you can take me to Hell in the hour I wish for that hour to last longer" or something.

It ends up being just when his natural lifespan ends, he goes straight to hell. Mephistopheles finds him a girl to seduce whose name is either Gretchen or Margareta--apparently Gretchen is a shortening of the name, but nobody told me that, and I never would have guessed--and then he leaves to go cavort with witches and fairies.

When he comes back, she's in jail for having killed her mother and his baby. She wants to die, and Mephistopheles hauls Faust off as the jailers come.

Wouldn't Faust's death now mean he goes straight to hell? End Part One. Part Two opens with a pastoral scene of fairies doing vague things.

This is the literary version of Bambi's mother's death. We bounce around with various kings fighting, and then the story turns into an Iliad fanfic, pairing up Helen of Troy with Faust.

She dies. Faust gets old and dies, then the angels come and swipe him out of Mephistopheles's grasp.

No, they don't really explain this. It might be because he "strove," but if that's it, then what we have is a mess of works righteousness--and what's more, these good actions that saved him were not shown!

This book is crazy. I read that it took Goethe sixty years on-and-off to write, and it looks as if he didn't bother to go over what he'd written before.

The plot halts for long stretches, characters we've never met before spout a few lines as their introduction and leave, and Faust himself is often left in the dust.

There's one particularly long section in which we follow a homunculus and philosopher around, without even Mephistopheles to pretend this has anything to do with the rest of the story.

Random bits of mythology are injected whenever possible, whether it makes any sense or not. Maybe other versions of Faust are better, I don't know.

If it had stopped at Part One, it would have worked, but it didn't. I only read this because Faust was in The Band Wagon.

The Band Wagon is awesome. Go watch that instead. I get that this an important novel. It's full of metaphors and meaning and humor of a sort and blahblahblah.

Just no. I liked the idea , the Faustian myth. How is that searching for knowledge? How does that help Faust crack the mysteries of the metaphysical?

How does knocking up a fifteen year old girl and killing her brother AND helping her accidentally kill her mother, wtf, seriously, what EVEN help him reach transcendental knowledge??

I'm pretty sure I was like for most of the book With the occasional Followed by And for good measure When I finally finished I was all hide spoiler ] View all 14 comments.

Oct 08, linda flourishreader rated it it was ok Shelves: own-a-copy , reads , classics. What is Faust? To me, there is no answer to that question.

Faust evades description and assignment. It is many things at once: pure poetry, closet play, classical tragedy, and even comedy. It is irreverent to its own material, changing in focus and mood at whim.

Goethe shamelessly cuts into the most dramatic moments of the Gretchen tragedy to include completely spurious epigrams.

At a glance, the wager between Faust and Mephistopheles seems almost tacked on to the parts dealing with his relati What is Faust?

At a glance, the wager between Faust and Mephistopheles seems almost tacked on to the parts dealing with his relationship with Gretchen and vice versa.

That being said, there is a continuity to it all. Although rough, it flows and some semblance can be gleaned of the entire work.

It is both complete and fragmentary. Above everything else, the amazingly poetic sections and the very gripping tragedy of Gretchen, it is this fragmentary nature that I find most enjoyable.

No statue of Michelangelo, not even the Pieta, has ever touched me in the same way as his incomplete Slaves.

David, perfect in its Vitruvian proportions, is so distant and inhuman it touches me as an allegory given an alien human shape.

The incomplete Slave, still half buried in the rough marble, speaks to me of perfect humanity. The process is still underway.

The thoughts of the artist are still visible. That over the top polish is not yet applied. At any point, the artist could pick his tools back up and continue on.

The moment of hesitation, of thought is still visible. I really commend David Luke for going into such detail on the three separate periods of composition and what each period entailed.

David Luke really shined a light on this book that I feel thankful for. That such a long period of time had passed, and so much had changed but also been left the same brought this feeling of being both complete and incomplete to a new height for me.

I come out of this book with probably the most confounded thoughts I have had in a while. That "central to the Western Canon" idea has always been readily apparent to me.

I could immediately see, even if I personally did not enjoy it, why a book is held in such esteem. Goethe dismantled that notion of apparentness that I had been clinging to.

Its perfect in its paradoxical condition. Its something that I feel inherently drawn back to. A reread will definitely be occurring in the near future.

Nov 24, Sara Jovanovic rated it it was ok. When I was reading Ulysses , I thought Circe chapter was crazy and wondered why Joyce immersed himself as much into creating that play like chapter.

Older plays aren't as dramatic, are they? But now I understand why. Because this was insane. I debated for so long during my reading time whether to give this one or two stars.

At the end, I decided it was worth two. It isn't the worst book I've ever read, but I definitely didn't enjoyed it. So what exactly made me raise my rating?

I have to say that When I was reading Ulysses , I thought Circe chapter was crazy and wondered why Joyce immersed himself as much into creating that play like chapter.

I have to say that Mephistopheles is one of the best characters I came across in a while. Besides being unexceptionally funny and making the play worth finishing, he actually made me interested in debating the deeper meaning of the book, so I can't wait until we start analyzing it in school.

I also adore reading about bargaining your soul with the devil, so that aspect really stood out to me.

4 Gedanken zu “Faust By”

Hinterlasse eine Antwort

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind markiert *